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February 14, 2014

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EXCLUSIVE Argentina: the accordion country
Brazil should take note to avoid following the same path as its neighbor

In 1910, Argentina boasted the world's tenth largest income per-capita. But since 1930, the country has gone into decline. Economist Raúl Prebisch warned that the region would not be able to keep up living standards by exporting commodities alone, the key was to industrialize. Now, Argentina has become an example of what not to do, Latin Business Chronicle reports. 

Brazilian retail sales drop most in a decade
Slow job market and sliding currency affected spending habits

Last December, Brazil's retail sales experienced the lowest growth in a decade, as inflation and diminishing customer confidence hit one of the country's strongest sectors. Sales grew 4.3 percent last year, the lowest expansion since 2003, mainly due to a slow job market, less lending and a weaker currency, Reuters reports.

Argentine President slams supermarkets
Leader cites price speculation on basic products

Argentine President Cristina Fernández de Kirchner (left) criticised the country's supermarkets and warned them they could face consequences for what she claimed is price speculation on basic products. She cited customers' complaints that the stores failed to comply with a recent agreement between the government and suppliers to contain the price of beef, sugar and yerba mate tea, Reuters reports.

Mexican President to challenge Televisa lawsuit
Broadcasters and pay-television firms battle over free-to-air channels

Mexico's Enrique Peña Nieto will challenge a judge's ruling that the country's telecoms regulator, IFT, lacks the standing to force broadcasters to let cable and satellite firms to carry their content for free. Televisa last week obtained a court ruling which undermines an initiative passed by lawmakers that requires broadcasters to offer their over-the air content to carriers without charging fees, Bloomberg reports.

Venezuela anti-government protests turn deadly
Three people shot dead during march against Nicolás Maduro's policies

Violence during anti-government protests in Venezuela, which erupted on Wednesday, have left three people dead. Some 10,000 people, many of them students, gathered in Caracas to protest against President Nicolás Maduro's government. In response, Maduro condemned the acts, adding that "there will be no coup d'etat in Venezuela”, BBC reports.

MOREOVER

Peru promoting Kuelap Fortress as second top tourist site Bernama

Aeromexico announces new Mexico City-Rio de Janeiro service Sacramento Bee

Uruguay inflation seen at 7 to 9 percent: Mujica Reuters

U.S.-based Apache sells Argentine operations to YPF The Australian

Brazil state seeks loan to complete World Cup stadium News Track India

Mexico's Alfa sees investment of $1 billion this year Yahoo

Colombia's financial sector grew 8.9 percent last year Colombia Reports

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