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Peru's fundamentals remain strong, spurring Latin America's fastest-growing economy.


BY JOACHIM BAMRUD

Despite a shake-up of Perus cabinet last week, the countrys outlook remains strong.  New prime minister Yehude Simon has said that key officials like Finance Minister Luis Valdivieso, Foreign Trade Minister Mercedes Araoz and Foreign Minister Jose Antonio Garcia Belaunde will remain, signaling that President Alan Garcia plans to keep his market-friendly policies.


"Were very bullish on Peru," says Leo Rodriguez, Latin America president for U.S.-based energy and technology conglomerate Emerson. "We are very excited about Peru."

Gustavo Brunser, business development manager at U.S.-based publishing and design software giant Adobe Systems, is also upbeat on the South American country. “Peru has been doing very well,” he says. “It’s a very good opportunity for us.”

These days, visiting foreign investors are filling up the flights to Peru and hotels in Lima. Delta Airlines, for example, can boast an 80 percent load factor on its U.S.-Peru flights during the first eight months this year. It typically has one daily flight between Lima and the United States, but in the high season between July 12 and September 12 it added an additional daily flight. Despite the added capacity, Delta saw a load factor of 79 percent in that period.  

Whats driving the invasion? Strong confidence in Perus business outlook, thanks in part to the booming economy.  
Perus economy is expected to grow by 9.2 percent this year, the International Monetary Fund said last week. Thats the best result in 14 years and will be Latin Americas highest growth rate. It also follows four years of average GDP growth of 7.1 percent. 

"More than 86 consecutive months of economic growth are evidence that Peru is living through an unprecedented economic bonanza," says Aldo Defilippi, executive director of the American Chamber of Commerce of Peru. “Peru seems to have found its course, and the correct decision of ...

 

 

Keywords: Alicorp, Buenaventura, competitiveness, construction, corruption, Delta, energy, poverty, U.S. free trade agreement

 

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