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Frequent Traveler: Best & Worst

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What's the best airport in Latin America? The worst? The best hotel? The best restaurant? A dozen executives give their answers.

BY CHRONICLE STAFF

For the second year in a row, Santiago has been named the favorite airport by business executives participating in Latin Business Chronicle's Frequent Traveler series. Santiago was named as the favorite Latin American airport by 13 of 21 executives who participated in the series during 2007.

The airport won praise for its modern infrastructure, including the highway linking it to Santiago. "It can take 15 minutes from leaving the airport and until you check in at hotel," commented Minoru Itaya, vice president for Latin America for SonyEricsson. "It's amazing."

Eseiza in Buenos Aires - Santiago's closest "rival" - was named as the favorite airport by two executives. Other airports mentioned included those of Caracas, Guatemala City and  Panama City.

Caracas was again mentioned as the worst airport. Five executives singled that airport as the worst in Latin America.  "There's a long road from the airport to Caracas, unpredictable flights due to limited offer, limited lounge facilities and no good food or restaurants available," complained Mathias Carlbaum, sales and marketing director for Scania Latin America.

Runners up as the worst airports were Sao Paulo and Miami, which each got four votes, while Bogota's El Dorado received two votes.

BEST HOTELS

The best hotel in Latin America? A tie between the Four Seasons in Mexico City and the Marriott San Jose, which each received three votes. "I love the ambience there," said David Berger, managing director for Latin America for NAI Global, about the Four Seasons in Mexico City. "The service is excellent."

Carlos Triviño, managing director for Avaya's Vecca division, singled out the San Jose Marriott's Spanish architecture, the room comforts and the bathrooms.

Runners-up among the hotel favorites were the Hyatt Santiago and Casa Medina in Bogota, which received two votes each.

There was also a tie when it came to naming the best restaurant. The Figueira in Sao Paulo (the winner in 2006) received three votes, as did Cabana Las Lilas in Buenos Aires (runner-up in 2006). "They have the best steaks and wines," Alessandro Lamanna, Vice President, Sales and Channel, Multimedia, Nokia Latin America, says of Cabana Las Lilas.

For complete answers, see this link.

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