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Nicaragua Elections:  The Background

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Daniel Ortega leads the presidential vote in Nicaragua. Here is the lowdown on what an Ortega victory could mean and where Nicaragua’s economy stands.

Special Reports and Country Briefs

Ortega's Nicaragua: Economic Outlook 
Will Daniel Ortega bring back hyperinflation and economic chaos?
Special Report

Nicaragua Country Brief
Macro economy, FDI, trade, corruption, economic and political freedom, and more.
Country Brief

Nicaragua: What's At Stake
The Nicaraguan elections will have loud geopolitical reverberations for inter-American relations, reports Richard Feinberg.
Special Report

Comments and Analysis

Ortega's Comeback: Charisma with an Iron Grip? 
Unless Daniel Ortega has had a change of heart, Nicaraguans can expect a president who acts with impunity, justifies corruption among friends, deals ruthlessly with adversaries, and scares off investors, argues Stephen Johnson.
Guest Column

Back by Unpopular Demand
If Daniel Ortega were to regain the presidency, the reversal of the democratic trend in Central America would be devastating, argues Roger Noriega.
Guest Column

Can DR-CAFTA Compete?
DR-CAFTA countries have several advantages, including close proximity to the region’s major export market and relatively inexpensive labor. But challenges include weak public structures and low access to capital, argues Jerry Haar.
Guest Column

More Reports

Nicaragua Elections:  Too Close to Call 
If elected, the FSLN pledges that it will not engage in the outright property expropriations of the 1980s - a credible promise since many Sandinistas are now capitalists and landowners. But the Sandinistas – like the Somozas and Aleman - are already adept at manipulating state power to create an unequal playing field by subsidizing their colleagues and squeezing their competitors, reports Richard Feinberg.
Special Report

A Nicaragua Canal?
What are the chances for construction of a Nicaragua canal?
Special Report

Central American Tourism Boom
Nicaragua saw strong growth last year and managed to pass Panama in terms of arrivals.
Special Report

 

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