Top 50 ports: A poor year for the Caribbean Basin and transshipment activity.
EC1F5D91-970A-4DF0-A394-BFFB4503091C.jpg__330__300__CROPz0x330y300

19th August 2014

By Santiago Gutiérrez
Container throughput at the top Latin American ports increased by 1.1% in 2013, remarkably less than the 2.4% GDP regional growth in that year. “The figures confirm the slowdown in foreign trade in the region, setting the total volume of activity at 46 million TEU,” said an ECLAC report on maritime transport.A significant number of container ports in the region slowed down in 2013 (20 out of the Top 50,)leaving a bleak final traffic figure, which differs much from those achieved in 2010 and 2011, when activity grew by 14% per year.
ECLAC attributes last year’s decline to a generalized deterioration in five countries in the Caribbean Basin, where transshipment operations represent a significant volume of activity of their ports. “In 2013, Colombia and Jamaica revealed an annual decline of -6.9 % and -8.2%, respectively, and in Venezuela, Panamá and Dominican Republic, contractions recorded during the same period were -8.2%, -4.3% and -21.7%,” respectively, the report said. Freeport (Bahamas, 24.8%) and Havana (Cuba, 10%) were the only container ports in the Caribbean region which showed growth.
In contrast, four countries in South America maintained a steady growth in container handling, despite the declining rate in the global context. These were Argentina (9.8%), Brazil (6.2%), Uruguay (9.7%), Chile (6.0%) and Ecuador (3.9%).
As expected, port performance quite often depends more on management, than on generalized cargo conditions.According to …

Click here : Log In To Read The Full Story
Subscribe to latin trade magazine
Click here to begin a subscription for Latin Trade magazine, available both in print and online.
Subscribe to lt.com
Click here to begin an online subscription to LT.com, with its extensive ranking, indices, and market intelligence on Latin America.
Subscribe to free Newsletter
Subscribe here to our free newsletter – getting the latest business headlines from Latin America in your inbox every day.
LOGIN
FOR READ MORE LOGIN
LOGIN
LOGIN
Forgot your password
SEND
READ MORE
Aenean sollicitudin, lorem quis bibendum auctor, nisi elit consequat ipsum, nec sagittis sem nibh id elit. Duis sed odio sit amet nibh vulputate cursus a sit amet mauris. Morbi accumsan ipsum velit. Nam nec tellus a odio tincidunt auctor a ornare odio. Sed non mauris vitae erat consequat auctor eu in elit.Aenean sollicitudin, lorem quis bibendum auctor, nisi elit consequat ipsum, nec sagittis sem nibh id elit. Duis sed odio sit amet nibh vulputate cursus a sit amet mauris. Morbi accumsan ipsum velit. Nam nec tellus a odio tincidunt auctor a ornare odio. Sed non mauris vitae erat consequat auctor eu in elit.
Read the current issue of Latin Trade Magazine

Access Denied

Please log in or register

Read Our Latest Issue

latintrade-followus-spanish
FOLLOW US