Ports: Colon, Balboa Lead
2445C3A6-8B64-4C5E-A614-6C30A3BE2086

26th April 2012

Colon and Balboa remain top ports in Latin America.

BY LBC STAFFThe Panamanian ports Colon and Balboa remained the top container ports in Latin America last year, according to data from the United Nations Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC).Santos in Brazil remained the third-largest, followed by Cartagena and Buenos Aires.

Container trade at Colon grew 20 percent to 3.4 million TEUs, while at Balboa trade increased 17.2 percent to 3.2 million TEUs. Santos saw a 10 percent increase to 3 million TEUs. Cartagena’s trade grew 17.2 percent, while Buenos Aires registered a seven percent increase to 1.9 million TEUs.Latin Americas Top 50 Ports Top ports ranked by TEUs in 2011. Percent change from 2010.

Rank

Ch.

Port, Country

11 TEU

Ch.

1

--

Colon, Panama

3,371,714

20.0

%

2

--

Balboa, Panama

3,232,265

17.2

%

3

--

Santos, Brazil

2,985,922

10.0

%

4

+1

Cartagena, Colombia

1,853,342

17.2

%

5

-1

Buenos Aires, Arg.

1,851,687

7.0

%

6

--

Manzanillo, Mexico

1,762,508

16.6

%

7

--

Callao, Peru

1,616,165

20.1

%

8

--

Guayaquil, Ecuador

1,405,762

25.2

%

9

+1

Itajai, Brazil

983,985

2.8

%

10

+1

Valparaiso, Chile

973,012

10.7

%

11

+3

L. Cardenas, Mexico

953,497

19.8

%

12

+1

Limon-Moin, Costa Rica

901,330

5.0

%

13

+4

Montevideo, Uruguay

861,164

28.2

%

14

-2

San Antonio, Chile

853,806

-1.9

%

15

+3

Buenaventura, Colombia

748,305

12.9

%

16

--

Veracruz, Mexico

732,538

10.6

%

17

-2

P. Cabello, Venezuela

721,500

14.5

%

18

+2

Paranagua, Brazil

681,678

24.7

%

19

--

Rio Grande, Brazil

618,039

-4.5

%

20

+1

Puerto Cortes, Honduras

576,752

7.0

%

21

+1

Altamira, Mexico

547,612

12.2

%

22

+2

Tomas de Castilla, Guatemala

494,908

14.8

%

23

+3

La Guaira, Venezuela

467,300

42.3

%

24

+1

Talcahuano-San Vicente, Chile

425,967

17.2

%

25

+3

Suape, Brazil

417,666

28.8

%

26

+3

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

415,446

31.7

%

27

+5

Puerto Quetzal, Guatemala

363,684

44.9

%

28

-1

Barrios, Guatemala

317,804

-2.8

%

29

+6

Lirquen, Chile

314,956

36.0

%

30

+3

Vitoria, Brazil

280,262

15.0

%

31

+3

Salvador, Brazil

242,758

3.9

%

32

-1

Iquique, Chile

237,758

-10.3

%

33

+3

Pecem, Brazil

190,656

14.0

%

34

+11

Itaguai-Rj/Sepetiba, Brazil

183,601

46.7

%

35

+11

Sao Francisco do Sul, Brazil

177,793

57.0

%

36

+4

Coronel, Chile

170,771

22.4

%

37

+5

Arica, Chile

170,110

29.9

%

38

-1

Caldera, Costa Rica

168,039

8.2

%

39

--

Acajutla, El Salvador

160,069

9.8

%

40

+3

Puerto Angamos, Chile

158,323

22.7

%

41

-3

Chibatao, Brazil

155,727

1.0

%

42

+2

Paita, Peru

153,653

21.4

%

43

+4

Barranquilla, Colombia

148,093

42.6

%

44

-3

Ensenada, Mexico

132,727

-2.1

%

45

N/A

Zarate, Argentina

107,928

24.3

%

46

+2

Antofagasta, Chile

88,213

-15.0

%

47

+2

Santa Marta, Colombia

87,320

-4.2

%

48

+2

Castilla, Honduras

85,892

6.0

%

49

N/A

Corinto, Nicaragua

80,075

23.5

%

50

N/A

Esmeraldas, Ecuador

66,764

7.7

%

Total

34,696,846

9.0

%

NOTES:

Colon includes MIT, Evergreen and Panama Port.

Buenos Aires includes Exolgan.

Cartagena includes SPR, El Bosque and Contecar.

Puerto Limon includes Moin.

Itajai includes Navegantes.

Sources: ECLAC Perfil Maritimo, Latin Business Chronicle

 

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